iPad And Android Tablet Market Share Margin Narrows Much Faster Than Originally Predicted

Image (2) apple-samsung-620x253.jpg for post 206796

Apple continued to win out in terms of tablet market share this past quarter, according to the latest figures from ABI Research, with a 55 percent share of all shipments during the period. That’s a lead it has had since 2010 when the iPad was introduced, but it’s also the slimmest lead it’s ever had, and represents a dip of 14 percent versus the previous quarter. At this rate, Android could overtake the iPad for tablet share sometime next year, something which seemed unlikely or even impossible in 2010 and 2011.

Shortly after the iPad’s introduction in 2010, there were predictions that Android would eventually overtake Apple’s market share in the tablet market the same way that Android smartphones had done with the iPhone. But early predictions tended to favor 2015 or 2016 as the crossover point at which Android tablets (from a variety of OEMs) would actually overtake iPad sales in terms of broad market share. Others still saw Apple dominating even longer – a 2011 Gartner study suggested Apple would keep 47 percent of the market in 2015, with Android coming up with just 38 percent.

Apple still hasn’t dipped that low, but Android now has 44 percent of the market, owing in part to the utter failure of any other tablet-based mobile platform. HP’s webOS was a brief-lived affair, and RIM’s PlayBook, despite remaining on sale, has failed to become a major competitor to either iOS or Android-based slates. That lack of competitive alternatives has helped Android gain share much faster than most originally predicted, meaning a tipping point might not be that far off.

In fact, a recent projection, analyst Sameer Singh from Finvista Advisors suggests Android may take the crown as early as mid-2013, just next year. The narrowing of the gap is testament to significant improvements in the quality and variety of Android tablet devices available, including strong, inexpensive entrants from Amazon (which are reportedly selling well this holiday season, though there aren’t any numbers attached to those claims), and Google’s Nexus 7 (which we heard some early numbers around from OEM partner Asus). Samsung also saw strong tablet performance, according to ABI.

ABI suggests that the iPad mini has done little to help Apple’s overall tablet sales, but I think it’s too early yet to tell what kind of impact that new form factor will ultimately have on the company’s market share and its own tablet breakdown. And even if Apple loses its majority share of the tablet market in 2013, that likely won’t have a negative impact on its financial performance; losing the smartphone market share crown, for instance, hasn’t stopped iPhone sales from seeing continued positive growth.


TechCrunch » Gadgets

Kickstarter: myLED Adds Another LED To Your iPhone

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One of Steve Jobs’ biggest pet peeves was external LED lights on cellphones. Oh how he would storm through the Apple offices, harrumphing at the thought of a Motorola KRZR lighting up like a tiny Christmas tree. He’d probably be really angry at this new product, myLED, which is a tiny LED that’s designed to light up when you get an iOS notification.

The product will blink red when you receive calls, emails, Facebook notifications, Tweets, and Skype messages. It works by plugging directly into your headphone jack and they’ve included a little clamp to hold the LED when you’re not using it.

The little LED and the app needed to run it will cost $ 10 for early birds and they’re looking for $ 18,000 in funding.

Obviously this kind of takes up your headphone jack but it seems like a good idea if you’re not into having your camera flash twinkle when you get a call. Much like the Blink(1), this product reduces notifications to its barest element, which is useful and important, even if it might have pissed off Jobs.

Created by Federico Nitidi, Sean Lewin, and Ralph Wilson, the project came about when the team “became passionate about solving the lack of convenient notifications on iOS.” The project is currently in beta but they should ship in April.




TechCrunch » Gadgets

Some Samsung Galaxy Products Banned From Sale In The Netherlands As Court Sides With Apple

apple-samsung

A Dutch court ruled today (via IDG) that Samsung Galaxy products running Android 2.2.1 and higher, which don’t use Samsung’s own proprietary image gallery software are banned from sale, for infringing on an Apple patent related to scrolling through images on a touchscreen device. The ruling from The Court of The Hague stipulates that Samsung must report its profits from Galaxy device sales since June 27, 2011 to determine a penalty, and that Samsung risks incurring a $ 129,000 fee per day every day it fails to uphold the ban from this ruling on.

The decision comes after a preliminary ruling dealing with the same patent resulted in a sales ban on the Galaxy S, SII and Galaxy Ace last year, which prompted a software workaround implemented by Samsung to get the products back on the market. Samsung claimed at the hearing that since Samsung Benelux, the company’s Netherlands-based subsidiary, was no longer selling the infringing devices. Presiding judge Peter Blok told the court that was not sufficient to prevent a sales ban, and that Samsung’s refusal to sign a declaration of its intention not to infringe the patent was grounds enough to bar device sales in the country.

Apple’s patent deals specifically with a ‘bounce back’ animation effect that allows you to preview the next image in a series, but reverts to the current image when you raise your finger if you haven’t swiped all the way in one direction. Samsung’s workaround was to replace it with a blue glow highlighting the edge of the image, rather than using the bounce-back.

Apple could be in for another sizeable payday here, depending on how much of Samsung’s profits the court believes Apple is entitled to as a result of sales of infringing devices and barring any appeal attempts. But the ban itself seems unlikely to have much force; Samsung can implement the workaround described above on any devices that still use Android’s native Gallery app to sidestep the block on any future sales. In fact, Samsung argued in September that it already does this in all products sold in the Netherlands, but judges didn’t believe the Korean company provided sufficient evidence to make its case.


TechCrunch » Gadgets

iPad And Android Tablet Market Share Margin Narrows Much Faster Than Originally Predicted

Image (2) apple-samsung-620x253.jpg for post 206796

Apple continued to win out in terms of tablet market share this past quarter, according to the latest figures from ABI Research, with a 55 percent share of all shipments during the period. That’s a lead it has had since 2010 when the iPad was introduced, but it’s also the slimmest lead it’s ever had, and represents a dip of 14 percent versus the previous quarter. At this rate, Android could overtake the iPad for tablet share sometime next year, something which seemed unlikely or even impossible in 2010 and 2011.

Shortly after the iPad’s introduction in 2010, there were predictions that Android would eventually overtake Apple’s market share in the tablet market the same way that Android smartphones had done with the iPhone. But early predictions tended to favor 2015 or 2016 as the crossover point at which Android tablets (from a variety of OEMs) would actually overtake iPad sales in terms of broad market share. Others still saw Apple dominating even longer – a 2011 Gartner study suggested Apple would keep 47 percent of the market in 2015, with Android coming up with just 38 percent.

Apple still hasn’t dipped that low, but Android now has 44 percent of the market, owing in part to the utter failure of any other tablet-based mobile platform. HP’s webOS was a brief-lived affair, and RIM’s PlayBook, despite remaining on sale, has failed to become a major competitor to either iOS or Android-based slates. That lack of competitive alternatives has helped Android gain share much faster than most originally predicted, meaning a tipping point might not be that far off.

In fact, a recent projection, analyst Sameer Singh from Finvista Advisors suggests Android may take the crown as early as mid-2013, just next year. The narrowing of the gap is testament to significant improvements in the quality and variety of Android tablet devices available, including strong, inexpensive entrants from Amazon (which are reportedly selling well this holiday season, though there aren’t any numbers attached to those claims), and Google’s Nexus 7 (which we heard some early numbers around from OEM partner Asus). Samsung also saw strong tablet performance, according to ABI.

ABI suggests that the iPad mini has done little to help Apple’s overall tablet sales, but I think it’s too early yet to tell what kind of impact that new form factor will ultimately have on the company’s market share and its own tablet breakdown. And even if Apple loses its majority share of the tablet market in 2013, that likely won’t have a negative impact on its financial performance; losing the smartphone market share crown, for instance, hasn’t stopped iPhone sales from seeing continued positive growth.


TechCrunch » android

Google Returning Month Of December To Nexus Devices With Android 4.2.1 OTA Update

calendar-bug-android

Google is in the process of rolling out Android 4.2.1 to at least Nexus 4 and Nexus 10 devices (with Nexus 7 and Galaxy Nexus hardware likely to follow) as an over-the-air update, Android Central reports. The minor update brings a fix for an embarrassing omission on Google’s part: The month of December. December was left out of the People app, meaning it couldn’t be chosen as either a birthday or anniversary for contacts on Android 4.2 devices.

December was missing from the Android date picker for certain functions, though luckily not for the Calendar app, meaning you could still set appointments or block off your Christmas vacation. But the bug was nonetheless a fairly significant oversight, and one that brought a lot of derision from the user community and media. Google reportedly checked out the issue as soon as it became public, though didn’t officially note it until the company promised a fix a few days later on November 20.

When Google finally copped to the bug, Frederic noted that it took the company quite a while to even officially acknowledge that the easily verified bug existed, but roughly two weeks from bug identification to pushing out a fix actually isn’t that bad of a timeline at all. Now, a week after that, users are seeing the update roll out OTA to their devices, which apparently brings little else to the table beyond zapping the December bug.

The update is being rolled out gradually, as is generally the case with new versions of Android, so don’t worry if you aren’t seeing it yet. One other interesting tidbit: Android Central says this doesn’t appear to break the loophole that allows users to activate LTE on their Nexus 4 for band 4 frequencies, like those used in Canada. Which is great news, because that’s a feature I’m pretty interested in keeping, maybe more so than December.


TechCrunch » Gadgets